Mis-Dakdek

Miscellaneous Diq-dooq from Chevras HamMis-dakdekim.
"Oh no! The diqueduque geeques are here! Run for the hills!"Godol Hador, 06.29.06 2:45 pm


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Wednesday, December 07, 2005

Glossary

I have noticed that the "SLaM Kavvana Club" (Steg, Lipman, and Mar) has developed its own terminology for a number of things. This is to be a collaborative post, on which all members are encouraged to work.

Let me (Mar Gavriel) start it out with a few:

[NB: Red items are Steg's coinages; blue items are MarGavriel's coinages; green items are Lipman's coinages.]

Dickdook = grammar. (Note: this spelling is used only in sexual contexts.)
Dog-and-Pon(e)y Show = Qabbālath Shabbāth
Ohrrer-Forrer = præcentor (שליח ציבור)
Shnei Zeisim = a mixed drink, made with two olives (שני זיתים), and with some sugar or salt on top, to create the appearance of snow (Schnee). See recipe.
Tequila Gedolah = literally, a popular Mexican drink for Rōsh Hasshānā. However, it has a number of figurative connotations, as well, especially in certain fixed expressions. I'm not sure exactly what these are; perhaps Lipman can help.
Wierd = weird. The normal English spelling weird is also used, at least by Steg and Lipman, but must be preceded by an asterisk.

11 Comments:

Blogger Habib said...

My candidate:

Half Torah: the reading from the Accounts of the Profits; 50% as important as the Pentateuch.

12/07/2005 5:06 PM  
Blogger Mar Gavriel said...

Habib--

You don't need to post in a comment. As a member of this blog, you can edit the post directly. Just sign into Blogger for Mis-Dakdek, and edit the post.

12/07/2005 6:27 PM  
Blogger Lipman said...

Shnei zeisim

This is stressed on the first word, otherwise the waiter might serve you two plain snowless olives without the drink in the frosted glass.


Wierd = weird. The normal English spelling weird is also used, at least by Steg and Lipman, but must be preceded by an asterisk.

Or followed by one.

12/08/2005 1:08 AM  
Blogger Steg (dos iz nit der šteg) said...

I still pronounce haphazard as half hazard... :-P

12/08/2005 7:07 AM  
Blogger The back of the hill said...

Vi macht man a shney zeisim?

I'm guessing with a kabeitzah of Gin, and a kazeisah of vermouth.
And tzvey kazeisim pri etz zeis.

Or is it two kbeitzim of Ginim?

12/08/2005 3:38 PM  
Blogger The back of the hill said...

Let me add the word kajester.

Being where merchants at Columbus and Broadway put their money.

12/08/2005 3:41 PM  
Blogger Mar Gavriel said...

"Kajester"? I don't get it.

12/08/2005 8:16 PM  
Blogger The back of the hill said...

It's how both Monzer El-Shawa (shouldn't that be Esh-Shawa?) and Candy Wong pronounce cash-register.

In consequence of which, the clerks from the two nearby bookstores also pronounce it thus. As well as the clerks at the cigar store.

12/09/2005 1:40 PM  
Blogger Lady-Light said...

you guys are FUNNY, nuts (and erudite), but FUNNY!

7/09/2006 10:54 AM  
Blogger B.BarNavi said...

I found the workd "Dickdook" first used an a colonial American primer for "Leshon Gnebreet".

10/24/2008 12:51 PM  
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